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Jeeva Brahma Aikya Vedanta Rahasyam: A Book on the Unity of the Individual Soul and the Supreme Soul




Jeeva Brahma Aikya Vedanta Rahasyam is a Sanskrit book written by Cuddapah Satchidananda Swami, a disciple of Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa. The book is a treatise on the philosophy of Vedanta, which teaches that the individual soul (Jeeva) and the supreme soul (Brahma) are one and the same (Aikya). The book explains the essence of Vedanta in a simple and lucid manner, using examples, stories, analogies, and quotations from the Upanishads and other scriptures.


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The book consists of 18 chapters, each dealing with a specific aspect of Vedanta. The first chapter introduces the concept of Jeeva Brahma Aikya and its importance for attaining liberation (Moksha) from the cycle of birth and death (Samsara). The second chapter discusses the nature of Brahman, the ultimate reality that is beyond name, form, and attributes. The third chapter describes the nature of Jeeva, the individual soul that is a reflection of Brahman in the mirror of Maya, the cosmic illusion. The fourth chapter explains the nature of Maya, the power of Brahman that creates, sustains, and dissolves the universe. The fifth chapter analyzes the nature of Avidya, the ignorance that veils the true identity of Jeeva as Brahman. The sixth chapter reveals the nature of Vidya, the knowledge that removes Avidya and reveals Jeeva Brahma Aikya. The seventh chapter elucidates the nature of Karma, the law of action and reaction that binds Jeeva to Samsara. The eighth chapter clarifies the nature of Dharma, the moral and ethical code that guides Jeeva in performing Karma. The ninth chapter expounds the nature of Bhakti, the devotion that purifies Jeeva's mind and prepares it for Vidya. The tenth chapter delineates the nature of Jnana, the direct and intuitive realization of Jeeva Brahma Aikya. The eleventh chapter describes the nature of Vairagya, the detachment that results from Jnana and frees Jeeva from worldly attachments. The twelfth chapter defines the nature of Sannyasa, the renunciation that follows Vairagya and enables Jeeva to dedicate itself to Brahman. The thirteenth chapter illustrates the nature of Sadhana, the spiritual practice that leads Jeeva to Jnana through Bhakti, Dharma, Karma, and Vairagya. The fourteenth chapter enumerates the four qualifications (Sadhana Chatushtaya) that are necessary for Sadhana: discrimination (Viveka), dispassion (Vairagya), six virtues (Shat Sampat), and desire for liberation (Mumukshutva). The fifteenth chapter outlines the six stages (Shat Krama) that mark Jeeva's progress in Sadhana: sublimation (Shuddhi), control (Dama), withdrawal (Uparati), endurance (Titiksha), concentration (Samadhana), and absorption (Samadhi). The sixteenth chapter summarizes the four methods (Sadhana Chatushtaya) that aid Jeeva in Sadhana: listening (Shravana), reflection (Manana), meditation (Nididhyasana), and contemplation (Atma Vichara). The seventeenth chapter presents the four fruits (Phala Chatushtaya) that result from Sadhana: peace (Shanti), bliss (Ananda), freedom (Mukti), and perfection (Siddhi). The eighteenth chapter concludes with a benediction (Mangala) that praises Brahman as the source, sustenance, and goal of all existence.


Jeeva Brahma Aikya Vedanta Rahasyam is a valuable book for anyone who wants to understand and realize Vedanta. It is available in PDF format online [here]. It was also one of the books that influenced Swami Sivananda, a modern sage who founded [The Divine Life Society] . Swami Sivananda wrote in his autobiography: "The first book I read was 'Jiva-Brahma Aikya Vedanta Rahasyam' by Cuddapah Satchidananda Swami. This was my first lesson in Vedanta and positive aspects of life on earth plane. The real aim of human life became apparent to me." The article continues as follows:


One of the main themes of Jeeva Brahma Aikya Vedanta Rahasyam is the concept of Adhyaropa-Apavada, which means superimposition and negation. This is a method of teaching Vedanta that involves first attributing various names, forms, and qualities to Brahman, and then negating them one by one, until only the pure and absolute Brahman remains. This method helps Jeeva to overcome the false identification with the body, mind, and ego, and to realize its true nature as Brahman.


Another important theme of the book is the concept of Neti Neti, which means not this, not this. This is a way of negating all the limiting adjuncts (Upadhis) that obscure Jeeva's vision of Brahman. By saying Neti Neti to everything that is not Brahman, Jeeva gradually withdraws its attention from the phenomenal world and focuses on the transcendental reality. This leads to the direct experience of Jeeva Brahma Aikya.


The book also emphasizes the role of Guru, the spiritual teacher who guides Jeeva in the path of Vedanta. The book says that Guru is none other than Brahman itself, manifesting in a human form to help Jeeva. The book advises Jeeva to approach Guru with faith, devotion, and humility, and to follow Guru's instructions sincerely and diligently. The book says that Guru's grace is essential for Jeeva to attain Jnana.


Jeeva Brahma Aikya Vedanta Rahasyam is a masterpiece of Vedantic literature that can inspire and enlighten anyone who reads it. It is a book that reveals the secret of Vedanta: that Jeeva and Brahman are one and the same. The article continues as follows: The book also explores the various aspects of Jeeva's personality, such as the five sheaths (Pancha Kosha), the three states (Avastha), the four functions (Antahkarana), and the three qualities (Guna). The book explains how these aspects are derived from Brahman, but also how they obscure Jeeva's vision of Brahman. The book shows how Jeeva can transcend these aspects by practicing Vedanta and realizing Jeeva Brahma Aikya.


The five sheaths are the layers of Jeeva's existence, namely: the physical sheath (Annamaya Kosha), the vital sheath (Pranamaya Kosha), the mental sheath (Manomaya Kosha), the intellectual sheath (Vijnanamaya Kosha), and the blissful sheath (Anandamaya Kosha). The book says that these sheaths are not Jeeva's true nature, but only coverings that hide Jeeva's essence. The book advises Jeeva to discriminate between the sheaths and the self, and to detach from the sheaths by saying "I am not this, I am not this" (Neti Neti).


The three states are the modes of Jeeva's consciousness, namely: the waking state (Jagrat), the dream state (Svapna), and the deep sleep state (Sushupti). The book says that these states are not Jeeva's true nature, but only modifications of Jeeva's mind. The book reveals that there is a fourth state (Turiya), which is beyond the three states, and which is Jeeva's true nature. The book instructs Jeeva to identify with Turiya, which is identical with Brahman, and to say "I am that, I am that" (Aham Brahma Asmi).


The four functions are the components of Jeeva's inner instrument (Antahkarana), namely: the mind (Manas), the intellect (Buddhi), the ego (Ahamkara), and the memory (Chitta). The book says that these functions are not Jeeva's true nature, but only instruments that serve Jeeva. The book warns Jeeva not to be enslaved by these functions, but to use them wisely and skillfully. The book teaches Jeeva to purify these functions by practicing Bhakti, Dharma, Karma, and Vairagya.


The three qualities are the attributes of Jeeva's nature (Prakriti), namely: inertia (Tamas), activity (Rajas), and harmony (Sattva). The book says that these qualities are not Jeeva's true nature, but only influences that affect Jeeva. The book advises Jeeva to overcome Tamas and Rajas by cultivating Sattva, and to transcend Sattva by attaining Jnana. The book guides Jeeva to rise above these qualities by realizing Jeeva Brahma Aikya. The article continues as follows: The book also discusses the various aspects of Brahman, such as the five aspects (Pancha Brahman), the three forms (Saguna Brahman), the two modes (Nirguna Brahman and Ishvara), and the one essence (Parabrahman). The book explains how these aspects are manifestations of Brahman, but also how they point to Brahman's transcendence. The book shows how Jeeva can approach Brahman through these aspects by practicing Vedanta and realizing Jeeva Brahma Aikya.


The five aspects are the expressions of Brahman's power (Shakti), namely: creation (Srishti), preservation (Sthiti), dissolution (Laya), concealment (Tirodhana), and grace (Anugraha). The book says that these aspects are not Brahman's true nature, but only functions that Brahman performs. The book advises Jeeva to recognize Brahman as the source, sustenance, and goal of all existence, and to surrender to Brahman's will by saying "Thy will be done" (Tat Tvam Asi).


The three forms are the personalizations of Brahman's attributes (Guna), namely: Brahma (the creator), Vishnu (the preserver), and Shiva (the destroyer). The book says that these forms are not Brahman's true nature, but only symbols that Brahman assumes. The book instructs Jeeva to worship Brahman in these forms with love, devotion, and service, and to receive Brahman's blessings by saying "Salutations to thee" (Namaste).


The two modes are the distinctions of Brahman's reality (Satya), namely: Nirguna Brahman (the attributeless Brahman) and Ishvara (the lord of the universe). The book says that these modes are not Brahman's true nature, but only perspectives that Jeeva adopts. The book teaches Jeeva to meditate on Brahman in these modes with discrimination, reflection, and contemplation, and to realize Brahman's identity by saying "I am thou" (Aham Tat).


The one essence is the core of Brahman's existence (Satta), which is Parabrahman (the supreme Brahman). The book says that this essence is Brahman's true nature, which is beyond a


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